The NEW YEAR nears. Are you ready?

By Michael Patino on 2014-10-24 15:25:33 -

Are you ready for the fourth quarter. Plan now. Realistically there are only seven productive weeks left in this calendar year. Take a look at maintenance issues and what you will be doing to be ready for 2015. 

As you forecast the goals and objectives of the coming year, consider how Indoff can assist you in reaching the goal. Not sure how. Give Indoff a call.

anchoring shelving anchoring rack

Put Indoff to Work for You

By Michael Patino on 2013-10-01 19:31:04 -

Introduction to Indoff and our servicesIndoff and its services

Personal Earthquake Preparedness

By Michael Patino on 2012-11-20 20:25:32 -

How do we prepare for earthquakes?

The First Step is to make sure that you have your earthquake survival gear and know how to secure your home and personal safety when an earthquake strikes.

The Second Step is to make sure that you’re able to grab everything you need – necessities, keepsakes, vital information – and leave for a safer location, in less than ten minutes. It’s a lot easier than it sounds. All you need is to do is to take the necessary steps now, to ensure you have access to all the items and information that will help you get back to living your normal life, as quickly and easily as possible. You'll also want to make sure that the things that are most vital to you -- your important papers, financial and insurance information, treasured photos, videos and music and scannable keepsakes are backed up onto a portable hard drive and stored in a safe deposit box or safe, in the town where you will go during evacuation. That way it will be safe, sound and waiting for you when you arrive.

The Third Step is to make sure that you have a pre-written plan of what you’ll do and where you’ll go when a disaster strikes, including a plan for how you’ll get back to your normal life, once the disaster is over.

The best way to physically prepare for earthquakes, is to think through the different scenarios that could take place. If a quake is large enough to have to “deal with,” chances are the electricity is going to go out. Telephone and/or cell service could also be down. In Japan, Haiti and Calexico, power lines fell, plunging the city into darkness. That means not only means you won’t have light, but you also won’t have power for computers or televisions and radios. Grocery and drug stores won’t be able to ring up purchases, ATMs won’t work, garage door openers might not function. Name any tool or convenience we rely on in this world and chances are it’s powered by electricity.

So your first defense is making sure that you always have an alternative source of power, battery powered flashlights, extra cash, a supply of canned or frozen food that doesn’t need to be cooked to be eaten, and the all-important supply of water – enough to last you and everyone in your family for three days. Since your home or neighborhood might have significant damage, keep rubber-soled shoes, a warm jacket and other emergency gear within reach of your bed or right inside your closet. Rubber soled shoes will protect your feet from the broken glass and rocks that will probably be strewn everywhere.

We aren’t going to get into the details of how to turn off your gas, when to boil water or a list of items to have on hand for an earthquake, because there are literally hundreds of sources for that information. In fact here are a few of our favorite guides and videos:

You should also create or update your evacuation checklist, detailing the items that you and your family would need if you were unable to live in your home for three or more days. This includes all of your necessities, prescriptions, vital documents (or access to them on portable hard drives, online or in out of area safe deposit boxes), keepsakes, personal and professional contacts, ID and basic medical history and anything else that your family will need while evacuated.

Having two plans can make all the difference in getting you through those first few days and weeks after a disaster strikes.

The evacuation plan is pretty simple. It all comes from one question… If you were at home or at work and suddenly had to evacuate your home, or your general area, where would you go?

As you think about the locations you’ll use for your evacuation, consider, the people traveling with you, how you’ll get there (car, bus, plane), any pets traveling with you and whether those locations will actually work for you – for instance are they close to stores or services your family might need, like pharmacies, clothing, banks and doctors.

We suggest that people have three different locations in mind, to give you different types of locations and choices depending on the circumstances. As you create your plan, write everything down in detail. If you have to use this plan, you and the people you love are probably going to be in panic mode and following an easy to understand plan, will help calm and focus you.

Write down the people who will be traveling with you, and any special instructions you’ll need to gather everyone together, in case a disaster or emergency occurs while you’re all away from home. Name the location that you and your family will use to meet up with each other and the location you will be evacuating to, if you cannot live in your home, but your immediate area is still safe. Include the address of the location, contact phone, email address and directions.

Next choose a location (writing down the details, address and contact information) that your family will use if you not only need to evacuate your home, but your immediate area or city. This might happen during a moderate hurricane or a tornado. Your third location is out of state, for a serious, widely destructive emergency like the Japan or Chile Earthquake, Hurricane Katrina, the Colorado Wildfires, or other disaster that will make your entire region uninhabitable.

You will also include these locations on your emergency wallet card and your family’s wallet cards. Now, no matter what the disaster, even a fire or local emergency, you and your family will now know where and how to gather, and who will be responsible for what, so you can quickly reunite and travel on to your emergency location together. If you like, you can also give a card to the person you chose to be your out-of-area contact as well.

Will you have any pets traveling with you? Be sure to fill out the pet section, so that you will have all the information you need for them, like the name and numbers for the veterinarian, their licenses, and names/numbers of kennels in the location you are evacuating to and any prescriptions or special instructions you’ll need until you return home.


Take a few minutes to think about the following questions:

    How will we handle our bank accounts, paying our monthly bills and receiving our paychecks? How much emergency cash do we need to have, while traveling?
    What are our credit card limits and toll free numbers for emergency increases?
    How will we work? Will we work remotely or have to look for new positions? What people or contacts can we call about temporary or permanent jobs?
    How will we handle our medical, dental and prescription needs while in the new location? What doctors and dentists can we use while there?
    How long can we stay in our evacuation location? If we need to remain evacuated longer, where will we go/stay? Who will our real estate contacts be, if we need to find new permanent or temporary housing?
    How are we going to secure the property or vehicles we had to leave behind?
    How will we take care of our pets, during the evacuation and until we find new permanent housing?
    How will we handle our transportation needs? What contacts will we need to purchase or lease vehicles?
    How will we handle our daycare needs? How will we handle getting our children into school if necessary? What schools or contacts will we need, to enroll them in a new school in a temporary or new location?
    How will we handle any special needs in our family?

Quoted from http://www.nokep.org/earthquake.htm?gclid=CKzF-9T_3rMCFQhyQgodgmgA2w 

Click the link for more information.

Updated Information... ITW Anchors

By Michael Patino on 2011-04-13 10:59:24 -

ITW REDHEAD Anchors

I have just received updated and corrected information from ITW regarding their approved concrete anchors. 

 

ITW (REDHEAD) ANCHORS:

  • TRUBOLT+ Expansion Anchor, ESR-2427 Report, (3/8 -3/4)
  • 3/8 and 1/2 anchors require 4" minimum slab
  • 5/8 anchors require 6" minimum slab
  • 3/4 anchors require 7" minimum slab

These requirements have been tested and approved.  The reults are valid in all areas of the nation as well as internationally.

ITW TrueBolt+ Anchors

What Difference Does the Anchor Make?

By Michael Patino on 2011-03-28 01:50:57 -

It used to be that an anchor was an anchor.  In some states where there is low risk of seismic activity that may still be true. In those areas that require conformance to Uniform Building Code (UBC) or ICC's International Building Code (IBC), the results of the structural engineer's report will determine the brand, size and depth of the anchoring that is required.

Anchors are required to be tested with results approved by the ICC prior to being approved for use for permitted jobs. The conditions of these tests are stringent and for that reason deputy inspections are required by an approved deputy inspection firm. 

The engineer's calculations will state the number of anchors to be used, the accepted brand(s), the size and depth required. See the example of a detail drawing below.Anchoring Detail

 

Why Do I Need a Permit

By Michael Patino on 2011-03-22 23:10:17 -

 

How do you know what requires a building permit?  Take a look around you. Depending on your state and local jurisdiction, you may be surprised.

  • At your place of business you may need a permit if you are installing
  • Office partition that will stand higher than 5'9"
  • Shelving used for used for storage
  • Displays standing over 5'9"
  • Computer racks

If these furnishings stand less than 8' you may only need to get structural calculations as related to over turn and anchoring.  Your Community Building Department will be able to give you a list of information required for a permit.

Contact Michael Patino by Phone or e-mail for information regarding your specific government requirement.


Watch Your Flu Space and Exits in Racked Areas

By Michael Patino on 2011-02-16 02:10:04 -

January 1st 2011,  brough about some minor refinements that will effect the positioning of product in confined High Pile Rack areas. Six inch flue space must be maintained in all racked areas; if you are moving or setting up a new pallet rack area. If your pallets are over hanging to within 6" of the wall, you will now need to assure appropriate flu space between pallets even when the rack is against the wall.  A good rule of thumb would be to allow for 3" of overhang plus an additional 6",  I recommend that my clients start their pallet rack at least 12" off of the wall.  In some cases with higher capacity rack you may need to go 18" off the wall.

Please check out this document...

High Pile Combustible Storage

for a quick view of things that you should be aware of.  This document has some excellent diagrams that may be of assistance in determining the best way to have the proper flu space.

Guideline G-09  was published by the OCFA to guide you through high pile storage. The new version should be published during the first quarter of this year.

NOTE: Each local jurisdiction interprets fire code differently.  We recommend that you check with your local fire authority to determine the actual requirement for that jurisdiction.

Keep Your Pallet Rack in Good Repair

By Michael Patino on 2010-09-07 00:58:08 -

Pallet rack is designed to hold a great capacity of load. Engineers base their calculations on rack that is in good condition. Damage from forlifts and pallet loads can render the steel incapable of holding the designed load.? Many times, as aI perform a safety inspection in a warehouse I will see uprights with the front column no longer touching the ground. Or I will witness a double high pallet stacked into the side of the pallet rack upright.? These instances can be prevented.?I recommend the use of heavy duty barrier rail. It protects from forklift drivers and their loads.

Barrier Rail Protects RackBarrier Rail w offset footplates

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The above illustration demonstrates Ladder Industries' Barrier Rail being used to prevent the unsafe storage of pallets and staged loads against the pallet rack uprights.? End of aisle barrier serves little purpose if it is too close to the ground.? Do not confuse Barrier Rail with narrow Aisle guide rail.? They have very different purposes.

For a barrier rail to be usefull, it must be high enough to stop the load or vehicle that can cause the damage.? Common safety practices maintain that a forlkift should not travel with forks higher than twelve inches off the ground. If that is the case, a six inch angle iron? rail, anchored to the ground will not stop a forlift or its load from impacting the pallet rack.

Ladder Industries?Barriers are formed with 1/4" x 4" square tube posts and 10 ga. formed steel rails. They are designed to absord an impact of a 10,000 lb. load, travelling at 4 mph.? Baseplates are 10 x 10 and can be offset or centered depending on the application.? 42"H? double rail confirgurations are also available .

The 18" profile is high enough to prevent the pallet or forklift from hitting the rack structure. Should the barriers be hit by a forklift, the barriers will absorb the damage and protect the life of your rack investment.? The lift? out design allows for easy removal for servicing, cleaning and repairs.

Let Indoff assist you in finding?the appropriate barrier or bollard to keep your rack structurally sound.

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There are rules to be followed when starting a new installation!

By Michael Patino on 2010-05-14 17:02:34 -

ICC logoA A CheckList has been developed to assist and guide the designer and plans examiner through the provisions of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC), Chapters 1 through 11. The material is organized by subject to allow the user to quickly identify code requirements applicable to the project and have easy reference to the corresponding code text for further clarification.

The 2009 IRC CheckList covers the code provisions related to the planning, design and construction of typical residential buildings including requirements for construction documents, structural design criteria, fire and life safety, foundations, framing, weather protection, chimneys and fireplaces, and energy efficiency. The CheckList is also a useful tool for the contractor, builder and inspector in the planning, construction and inspection processes.

The following is a sample of the contents of the IRC Checklist... 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface................................................................................. vii

2009 IRC, Chapter 3–Design Criteria......................................... ix

2009 IRC Checklist–Sample Letter .............................................x

I. Construction Documents .....................................................1

A.Submittal Documents..... .......................................................1

B. Manufacturer’s Installation Instructions ..................................1

C. Areas Prone to Flooding .......................................................1

D. Site Plan ...........................................................................1

E. Design Criteria......................................    ...........................1

II. Building Planning...............................................................5

A. Site Address ......................................................................5

B. Exterior Wall Location..........................................................5

C. Light, Ventilation and Heating .............................................6

D. Minimum Room Areas and Ceiling Height .............................6

E. Sanitation, Toilet, Bath and Spaces ......................................7

F. Glazing ............................................................................7

G. Garages and Carports..........................................................9

H. Emergency Escape and Rescue Openings................................9

I. Means of Egress and Guards ................................................10

J. Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems...........................................12

K. Smoke Alarms ...................................................................12

L. Carbon Monoxide Alarms......................................................13

M.Foam Plastic ....................................................... ..............13

N. Insulation .........................................................................13

O. Dwelling Unit Separation ....................................................13

P. Vapor Retarders................................................................14

Q. Protection against Decay and Protection against Subterranean Termites ......14

R. Roof Ventilation and Attic Access .........................................15

S. Accessibility.............................................. ........................16

T. Storm Shelters....................................................................16

III. Wall Covering..................................................................17

A.Wall/Ceiling Interior Covering................................................17

B. Exterior Wall Covering ..........................................  ............17

IV. Chimneys and Fireplaces .................................................19

A. Masonry Fireplaces.............................................................19

B. Masonry Chimneys .............................................................20

The International code council is an excellent source of publications that regard regulations in your state or locality. Standard codes and amendments can be found at this link.

The Current Word on Concrete Anchors

By Michael Patino on 2009-08-21 12:54:58 -

reprinted by permission from LA Chapter Material Handling & Management Society Aug 2009

Anchors Revisited

As most of us are aware by now, all anchors that are to resist seismic forces, must be installed under the supervision of a deputy inspector.

The code change has allowed the "Periodic" in lieu of "Continuous" inspection.

Definition of the periodic supervision is up to the deputy inspector. However, the inspector should check the brand of anchor, observe how the holes are drilled (and cleaned) and observe some anchors being installed. He then returns, depending on the project size, and verifies the torque of the installed anchors.

The currently approved anchors in seismic areas are:

HILTI ANCHORS:

  • Kwik Bolt TZ (ESR-1917); Expansion anchor (3/8" – ¾")
  • HDA (ESR-1546); Undercut anchor (10mm-20mm)
  • HSL-3 (ESR-1545); Metric Sleeve Anchor (8mm-24mm)

ITW (REDHEAD) ANCHORS Updated 4-11-2011

  • TRUBOLT+ Expansion Anchor, ESR-2427 Report, (3/8 -3/4)
  • 3/8 and 1/2 anchors require 4" minimum slab
  • 5/8 anchors require 6" minimum slab
  • 3/4 anchors require 7" minimum slab

POWERS ANCHORS

  • Power Stud SD1 (ESR-2818); Expansion Anchor (3/8"-5/8")
  • Power Stud SD2 (ESR-2502); Expansion Anchor (3/8" – ¾")
  • Wedge Bolt (ESR-2526); Concrete Screw (3/8"- ¾")

SIMPSON ANCHORS:

  • Strong Bolt (ESR-1771); Expansion Anchor (1/2" –1")
  • Titen HD (ESR-2713); Concrete Screw (3/8" –3/4")

All anchors must be installed under the periodic supervision of a deputy inspector, typically hired and paid by the owner, through a testing agency.

All submittals to the city must have the anchors selected and their capacity calculated. No more "Or approved equal", as each manufacturer has different approval criteria.

Testing of anchors installed, without a deputy inspector present, MAY be allowed, provided the engineer of record writes a proposal to be approved by the building official. Know the rules!

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      Thanks to Sal Fateen, Seizmic Engineering and LAMHMS